Cat’s Friend Rahull Ravi of Dawn Hill Publications is Back With More Marketing Tips & Advice For Us. What is Marketing Non-Negotiables?


Image result for free images of people in marketing meeting

Marketing Non-Negotiables


Essential Rules to Live By:

I wish someone told me there are certain non-negotiables to marketing, before I entered the world of marketing, so I wouldn’t have made a fool of myself. I entered my first marketing role quite a few years ago, and to that job, I brought with me a few misguided pre-conceived notions about marketing.

The most dangerous notion being, assuming I could simply advertise my products on social media from the start. No value offers. No personality. Nothing. I quickly learned that you have offer something, some value, bring your personality to the table in order to increase my engagement, but we’ll get to that later, trust me.

Luckily for you, I made mistakes, so you won’t have to. I’ve improved and honed my marketing skills over the past few years, and I was lucky enough to realise there are a few non-negotiables to marketing.


These are the golden rules to marketing, so pay attention, and make notes:

Content is King:

  • Burn those three words into your memory and repeat it like a mantra every-time you think of new marketing methods.
  • You can learn the intricate ins and outs of Facebook’s Ads Manager and throw a £1000 daily budget into your many split-audiences and split-campaign objectives, but if your content is poor, if you’re using a shoddy image or a video shot with a 2005 Sony Ericson, then your campaign will fall flat on its face. Thud, bang, lights out.
  • Remember to look at the content around you and I don’t mean scrolling on your Instagram feed for 5 minutes and then going back to your Netflix series. I mean, you need to make a proper report.
  • Analyse your competitors, what sort of content do they release, is it visual, is it professional photography or is it digital design? What sort of engagement do they receive? How many social media sites are they on? Which sites are they not on? What sort of value are they providing with their content? Are they missing any areas of value or lacking in detail? These are just a few questions to consider.
  • The final point is key, whatever your competitor is doing wrong is essentially a gap in the market. While you shouldn’t base your entire strategy around it from the get-go, you should pay close attention to it and see if you can fill that gap and provide your audience with the content and value they’re so desperately yearning for!



Provide Value before you Promote:


  • Have you ever spoken to someone in real life who spoke about themselves non-stop and never asked how you’re doing? That’s how a lot of authors look like on Twitter and Instagram. They promote, promote and promote without ever listening to their audience and providing the value that they’re so desperately seeking!
  • It’s simple, provide value to your audience. If you’re an author, you should have a pretty good idea of what sort of advice and help you’d like to be receiving. Writing tips, marketing tips or simply some writing related humour.
  • If you can’t provide advice or help, then just have a conversation and support other authors, be nice. It’s certainly better than aimless promotion.
  • We’re not saying promotion should never occur, it’s most certainly important, just remember to provide some value first, that’s how you draw your audiences attention.

Consistency

“I’m getting no traction; I can’t be bothered anymore” – probably some aspiring author after a few weeks on Twitter. Here’s the thing about marketing, it’s really fun to do, until it’s not. I’ve spoken to a lot of aspiring marketers who have asked me, ‘how do you stay motivated?’. The truth is, I don’t. Some days, I’ve woken up and realised I have to put more time and effort into a channel that has been underperforming for weeks but I just get on with it. I do the work.

I don’t care if my writing or content comes out looking like hot garbage on the first draft, I can always edit it later! Let me tell you, that’s when you really learn about yourself and how far you’re willing to go to achieve your success. Ask yourself are you willing to work even when you don’t want to? Even when you’d rather be watching your favourite Netflix series? Don’t be an excuse generator, be an excuse incinerator.

Consistent posting on your marketing channels such as your blog, Twitter, Instagram etc, is what separates you from a lot of authors. Let me tell you, when you combine consistency with high quality content, and you have a delicious recipe for success.

Don’t believe me? Go to a successful YouTuber’s channel such as ‘Jenna Moreci’, go to her videos and sort it from ‘oldest to newest’. You’ll notice three things:

  • You’ll see consistent posting; most successful YouTubers post on their channel 4 to 5 times per month.
  • With successful channels, you’ll notice, as time goes on, the quality of the content is slowly getting better, the author of the videos is slowly but surely understanding what works with their audience, and what doesn’t work. That only happens when you post consistently, make mistakes quickly and learn with speed of Usain Bolt, not literally of course.
  • You’ll notice the engagement suddenly shoot through the roof, that’s what happens when high engagement, excellent SEO rankings and word-of-mouth all combine.

Consistency is key, there’s no way around it. There’s no secret to staying motivated either, some days you’ll have to grit your teeth and get through it. It’s never as bad as you think it’s going to be.

That’s it. Those are the three staples of marketing. These really are non-negotiables; you cannot avoid the universal truth that’s been laid out for you in this blog post. These three rules alone won’t lead you to glory, but they will be the backbone and foundation of your success.
Who said it would be easy?
Nobody.



Make sure you give Dawn Hill Publications a visit as they have more solid and sound marketing advice for authors and writers here https://www.dawnhillpublications.com/ They represent some amazing authors and a great place for readers to find new books to read!

Let’s Get Ready To Market Our Books Into The New Year With My Friends of ‘Dawn Hill Publications’…


What Are The Three Main Influencers of Book Purchases?
By Rauhall ~ https://www.dawnhillpublications.com/post/3-main-influencers-of-book-purchases


Dawn Hill Publications in the UK




Most self-published authors spend the majority of their week in two ways, writing their next novel and marketing their current book.

Courtesy of Dawn Hill Publications Marketing Director


It’s no secret that we operate in a highly saturated market, with hundreds of sub-markets which are also highly saturated, take for example, the romance genre. In the era of saturated markets and heavy competition, it’s important for authors to know what makes the book buyer think ‘yes, I’m going to buy this book!’.



Word of Mouth


Word of mouth is statistically proven to be the most popular reason for book purchases. Word of mouth translates to recommendations from friends or family. It makes a lot of sense that the average book buyer trusts the opinions of their friends and family over the transnational publisher waving their promotions in their face.

Word of mouth marketing is also undoubtedly the hardest to achieve and execute because you’re essentially not in direct control of anything. Most major publishers have an army of reviewers, major newspapers and popular bloggers to spread the word about their books. As a self-published author you can still achieve word of mouth sales, you’ll just need to put in a bit of work into developing a base of reviewers and followers first, but we’ll address that in a different post.

Book Reviews:

You guessed it! Who would of thought that the main influencer of word-of-mouth marketing would be crucial in increasing your book sales?! Okay, we’ll stop with the sarcasm, you get the point. Book reviews are crucial. Firstly, they provide valuable social proof that your book is worth the reader’s time.

Readers are often inundated with a plethora of book choices on Amazon and as a result they have to make snap decisions on which book link to click on and during this snap decision, most readers take into account the number of reviews a book has. The more, the merrier. Tip: find the average amount of reviews in your genre on Amazon’s search results and make that your review target.



Favorite Author:


For the most part, book readers are a loyal bunch. When they find an author they really love, they’ll stick to them like glue, often choosing their new releases over other books which are also very enticing. Writing a fantastic book goes a long way to securing your place in the hearts of readers, but it’s not the sole factor.

Many successful authors have strong personal brands on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, where they share aspects of their personal life and communicate with their audience. They’ve cultivated relationships with their readers, and this cannot be understated enough.

Once a reader falls in love with the personality of an author, as well as their writing, it’s a wrap. They will be purchasing their books until that author decides to stop writing.

Hope you enjoyed the read,
~ Rahull

logo_dawnhill.png


VISIT DAWN HILL PUBLICATIONS IF YOU ARE AN AVID READER and JOIN THE DHP REVIEWERS’ CLUB!
https://www.dawnhillpublications.com/drc



Authors? How Do You Handle “Bad Book Reviews?” An Article Share That Just Might Help! Courtesy of ‘Insecure Writer’s Support Group.” #10? My FAV!

IWSG Badge


A MUST VISIT FOR Writers and an Article Reshare About?  “BAD REVIEWS”

Bad reviews! Any writer with a published book gets crappy reviews. How do we deal with them?
…..
Here are ten tips:

….
1 – Refrain from responding
As much as you might want to respond, either politely or with harsh words, don’t do it. Once you’ve left a comment or sent out a Tweet or posted to Facebook, your negative response will be out there for all to see forever. You might get a few fans to rally to your cause, but most will view you as the villain, not the reviewer. Even if you later delete it, the damage is done. Sending an email is a bad idea as well. So refrain from adding fuel to the fire and keep your grumblings private.

2 – Know that it’s part of the process
Guess what? We all get negative reviews. It goes with the territory. Remember, you created art. Art is subjective and not everyone will like your book. You can’t please everyone. (And if you do, then you really didn’t say anything of value.)
Shake it off and move on.

….
……

3 – Laugh about it
What are you going to do—cry? Might as well laugh about it! Often a bad review is just as poorly written. So turn the tables and have a good chuckle about it.

4 – Remember they add validity to good reviews
What do you think when a book has nothing but five-star reviews? You start to wonder, don’t you? Friends and family of the author? Paid reviews? A couple bad reviews mean some readers were honest—which means the rest of the good reviews are probably honest as well. Plus sometimes people want to know if the book is really that bad and they read it!

5 – Look for constructive criticism
Often two and three-star reviews will offer constructive criticism. Look for it. Is there any validity to what they said? Can you see areas where you can improve or issues you need to address? (Several reviewers didn’t like the fact there were no women in my first book. I listened and made sure there were several women in the next one, including a female main character. That book garnered better reviews than the first.) Learn from the bad reviews and write a better book next time.

6 – Don’t focus on the negative
We tend to focus on the negative. We can have a hundred great reviews and one bad one. Which gets our attention? The bad one! Who cares? When doing averages, what do they always do? They drop the top numbers and the bottom numbers. So ignore that bad review and don’t even factor it into the equation.

7 – It’s just one person’s opinion
Everybody has an opinion. And they are just that—opinions, not facts. So one person didn’t like your book? Big deal! Out of millions of readers, that’s not even a drop in the bucket. (Unless all of your reviews are bad!)

8 – Don’t let it stop you
Yes, putting a book out there is scary. It’s a creative endeavor, which makes it a little more personal. We can’t take it personally though. We have to believe in ourselves and not let bad reviews stop us. Have you ever encountered a jerk at your work? Did it cause you to give up and stop working forever? No! So don’t let a negative review from someone you’ve never met stop you.

9 – Write the next book
This is the best thing you can do! Just hunker down and write your next book. Show those naysayers that you are a great writer. Take your experience from the previous book and pour it into the next one. Besides, you’ll be so busy writing, you won’t have time to worry about bad reviews.

…..
Image result for images cat reading to kill a mockingbird

……
10 – Kill off the reviewer in your next book
If all else fails, then just put that reviewer into your book as a murder victim or monster that is slain by the hero!

So come by today for more tips and advice at “The Insecure Writer’s Group”…

…>.
#########

…..
“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows, in the end, the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” – Teddy Roosevelt

How do you handle bad reviews?

****CAT****

 

I am Honored to Announce My New Author Interview With NF Reads. I Enjoy Writing.

NF READS ~ NFReads.com | Interesting Articles. Inspiring Stories.

I was honored and had the pleasure of being invited for an in-depth author interview by NFReads.com about my craft of writing, about why I wrote my book, about recovery life, and some other intriguing questions. I included and shared some book marketing tips for authors in the interview and shared about my long-term recovery as well.

I hope you will take some time to visit and read the Full Interview!

Interview with Author/Advocate, Catherine Townsend-Lyon

….
Addicted to Dimes (Confessions of a Liar and a Cheat)

“Books can come by imagination with vibrant storylines and characters. Come in many genres and about real life, or sometimes they come by way of a little “Divine Intervention” like my book.”   ~Author, Catherine Townsend-Lyon 

…..

AND The Last Question Was?

Tell us some quirky facts about yourself?

Oh my. OK. I love dill pickle slices and mayo sandwiches. I am a cat lover with three therapy cats named, Mr. Boots, Miss Prissy Princess, and Simon-Peter. I love writing when it rains and will keep my door cracked and window open to hear it while writing even if it is 20 degrees outside!

Lastly? 

Well, after everything I’ve been through in my life up to now? GOD let me keep my sense of humor!


…..

56848129_657000964754004_2110962222527152128_n(A little fun and $$$$ Raised For Big Jim’s Ride 4 Addiction at The Arizona State Capitol Event as One of The Guest Speakers – April 10th, 2019) LOL!!

“Ode to The Book Review”… Readers? How Come You Won’t Leave a Review When Done Reading a Book?

Welcome Avid Readers. Authors, and All-New visitors, 

As a book marketer and promoting many fine authors, the biggest thing that eludes ALL AUTHORS, WRITERS, and Marketers … WHY DON’T A READER LEAVE A BOOK REVIEW? 

Seriously. I really want to know what the reason is. If you are an AVID Reader, then you know how important a book review is for a writer who hards very hard on their craft and then to have the audacity to publish their work …

AND IS WHY a book review for us is so important. Be it a good, bad, or indifferent, book reviews are a way readers can let writers know how and why they loved a read or …not so much. It offers us, as writers, maybe some corrective advice if say a good mystery was missing elements or maybe the ending could have been better.

So, I came across a few book blogs that had some good advice and shared feelings of WHY books reviews are so important and thought I’d share them. As readers, I hope it will help all my readers who visit to understand the “WHY”…  *CAT*

<<<<<<<
3367

<<<<<<,

Hello, readers!

Remember, you don’t have to purchase my books from Amazon to leave a rating or review. If you were gifted any one book, downloaded them for free, bought them, found them in a Little Library, found them at a rest area, at a mall, some other random place, etc… You can still leave a rating. I encourage and ask that you do so, regardless of how you received any copies. If you really enjoyed my books, let me know. My main concern is how well you liked my stories, not how much I can make.


Ratings and reviews really help. It helps other readers know that they are getting a good read, and it also helps me, the Author. When I see how much someone enjoyed one of my books, it reminds me why I’m doing this in the first place. I want you to have a new literary universe that you can lose yourself in after you had a long, frustrating, or busy day.

So, go ahead and leave a rating or review at AmazonGoodreadsBarnes & NobleBooks A Million, etc. You don’t have to post much more than two or three words if you don’t want to. Even just a star rating will do. After that, you can follow me on my many social media platforms.

Thanks, and I as all authors appreciate the time you spent reading our books and reading this post! 

<<<<<<<
3review1


A SAMPLE OF HOW TO WRITE A QUICK BOOK REVIEW:

Since most reviews are brief, many writers begin with a catchy quip or anecdote that succinctly delivers their argument. But you can introduce your review differently depending on the argument and audience. The Writing Center’s handout on introductions can help you find an approach that works.

In general, you should include:

  • The name of the author and the book title and the main theme.
  • Relevant details about who the author is and where he/she stands in the genre or field of inquiry. You could also link the title to the subject to show how the title explains the subject matter.
  • The context of the book and/or your review. Placing your review in a framework that makes sense to your audience alerts readers to your “take” on the book. Perhaps you want to situate a book about the Cuban revolution in the context of Cold War rivalries between the United States and the Soviet Union. Another reviewer might want to consider the book in the framework of Latin American social movements. Your choice of context informs your argument.
  • The thesis of the book. If you are reviewing fiction, this may be difficult since novels, plays, and short stories rarely have explicit arguments. But identifying the book’s particular novelty, angle, or originality allows you to show what specific contribution the piece is trying to make.
  • Your thesis about the book.


Summary of content:

This should be brief, as analysis takes priority. In the course of making your assessment, you’ll hopefully be backing up your assertions with concrete evidence from the book so some summary will be dispersed throughout other parts of the review.

The necessary amount of summary also depends on your audience. Graduate students, beware! If you are writing book reviews for colleagues—to prepare for comprehensive exams, for example—you may want to devote more attention to summarizing the book’s contents. If, on the other hand, your audience has already read the book—such as a class assignment on the same work—you may have more liberty to explore more subtle points and to emphasize your own argument. See our handout on summary for more tips.

Analysis and evaluation of the book:

Your analysis and evaluation should be organized into paragraphs that deal with single aspects of your argument. This arrangement can be challenging when your purpose is to consider the book as a whole, but it can help you differentiate elements of your criticism and pair assertions with evidence more clearly. You do not necessarily need to work chronologically through the book as you discuss it.

Given the argument you want to make, you can organize your paragraphs more usefully by themes, methods, or other elements of the book. If you find it useful to include comparisons to other books, keep them brief so that the book under review remains in the spotlight. Avoid excessive quotation and give a specific page reference in parentheses when you do a quote. Remember that you can state many of the author’s points in your own words.

Conclusion:

Sum up or restate your thesis or make the final judgment regarding the book. You should not introduce new evidence for your argument in the conclusion. You can, however, introduce new ideas that go beyond the book if they extend the logic of your own thesis.

This paragraph needs to balance the book’s strengths and weaknesses in order to unify your evaluation. Did the body of your review have three negative paragraphs and one favorable one? What do they all add up to? The Writing Center’s handout on conclusions can help you make a final assessment.

IN THE REVIEW:

Finally, a few general considerations:

  • Review the book in front of you, not the book you wish the author had written. You can and should point out shortcomings or failures, but don’t criticize the book for not being something it was never intended to be.
  • With any luck, the author of the book worked hard to find the right words to express her ideas. You should attempt to do the same. Precise language allows you to control the tone of your review.
  • Never hesitate to challenge an assumption, approach, or argument. Be sure, however, to cite specific examples to back up your assertions carefully.
  • Try to present a balanced argument about the value of the book for its audience. You’re entitled—and sometimes obligated—to voice strong agreement or disagreement.

    But keep in mind that a bad book takes as long to write as a good one, and every author deserves fair treatment. Harsh judgments are difficult to prove and can give readers the sense that you were unfair in your assessment.

  • A great place to learn about book reviews is to look at examples. The New York Times Sunday Book Review and The New York Review of Books can show you how professional writers review books.

    #########

>>>>>>>

IT REALLY IS SIMPLE!

<<<<<<<

imageedit_7_9080497309

News & Experts Are Back and Marsha Shares WHY a Media Pitch Needs To Be Well Planned To Be Successful …

4 Tips For Creating Successful
Media Pitches
 by | Feb 19, 2019

….

Anyone who’s tried their hand at promoting a brand through PR can tell you that grabbing the media’s attention isn’t always easy.

Each day, newspaper journalists, as well as hosts and producers of TV and radio talk shows, scroll through a never-ending barrage of email messages, many of which they no doubt delete without reading.

Let’s face it, they couldn’t write about or report on all those topics even if they wanted to. Time just doesn’t allow it. So, with competition for the media’s attention so fierce, is it even possible to separate yourself from the pack and land an interview that will help build your credibility as a go-to expert in your field?

I’m here to tell you that, yes, it is possible, though a challenge if you have no experience playing the media’s game, which is why so many people turn to professionals. Still, if you’re determined to do it on your own, let me share a few things you need to keep in mind that can help you achieve success.

First, remember that while your goal is to promote your personal or company brands, that’s not the media’s goal. If your pitch sounds like a commercial, the media will suggest you contact their advertising departments.

As I point out in my upcoming bookGaining the Publicity Edge: An Entrepreneur’s Guide to Growing Your Brand Through National Media Coverage, what the media actually do want is useful and interesting information they can share with their readers, viewers, and listeners.

So, with that in mind, here are four tips to help make your pitches more successful:

  • Keep it short. You no doubt have a lot to say about your topic, but don’t say it all in your pitch. Print journalists and TV and radio show hosts don’t have time to read a thesis, no matter how remarkable your insights are, so keep it succinct. Think of those pitches as more like a movie preview, not the feature presentation. Certainly, include enough information for them to get the gist of what you can talk about, but leave all those extraordinary details you are tempted to cram into the pitch for the actual interview.
    ….
  • Solve a problem. The best ideas for articles and talk show interviews are those that help solve a problem the readers or audiences face. People perk up when your message means something to them personally, such as providing them tips on how to stick with a diet or save more for retirement. Ask yourself this: What are some of the problems my clients or customers are trying to solve? Those problems—and the solutions you can offer—can be the inspiration for a pitch.
    …..
  • Playoff what’s happening in the news. You increase your chances of engaging the media’s interest if your pitch aligns with something they are already writing and talking about. What’s going on that fits into your area of expertise? Are you a surgeon who can explain a new breakthrough involving your specialty, and what it will mean to patients? Are you a divorce lawyer who can comment on the latest celebrity split? One of our clients was a scientist who could talk about an eclipse that was in the news. We kept him busy with radio interviews leading up to that astronomical event!
    ……
  • Highlight your credentials. Why should the media—and the media’s audience—listen to you? Don’t dump your entire resume in the media’s laps, but you do want to include a short summary of relevant information about your background and expertise. For example, if you are a financial professional, let them know what licenses and certifications you have, and that you’ve been a partner in your firm for 10 years.

Finally, understand that pitching the media can take patience. Your first pitch might not get any takers. Your second and third might not either.

Don’t despair. At the end of your pitches, let the media know that if they have no interest in this particular idea, you’re available to talk about other topics related to your expertise as well.

“In the publicity game, persistence pays off.”

Diligently yours!

Marsha Friedman,  PR Expert

>>>>>

 

 

My Friends At TCK Publishing Helps Authors Be Amazing Writers With These Tips and Advice . . .

Welcome Friends, Writers, and Authors,

<<<<
Today I have a featured guest article from my friend Tom Corson-Knowles, CEO of TCK Publishing who shares some amazing advice and tips on becoming a more seasoned writer. I enjoy visiting his helpful website as he shares so much it keeps me coming back often and learning more about writing, authoring, selling my books and I can pass it on book marketing tips to all my author friends and clients.

Authors, make sure you check out his upcoming 2019 “TCK Publishing Readers Choice Awards” and enter your book! There are fabulous prizes and it helps get more exposure to your book! So let’s all learn some tips on becoming Better Writers!

<<<<

40 Tips On Creative Writing by Dan Buri FACEBOOK and TWITTER TEASER

<<<<<

“Writing professionally is a full-time job with part-time hours and never-ending responsibilities.”
Most professional writers don’t actually spend 8 hours writing each day, but that doesn’t mean they’re not working.

If you want to become a more productive writer, you have to learn to manage your work, your life, and your mental and physical wellbeing. You can’t sustain high levels of creativity and productivity as a writer without working on yourself.

Here are the 10 things that helped me become a more productive writer, and I hope these tips help you too.

1.  Schedule Your Work

You have to make time in your schedule for writing, marketing, and business time.

Don’t let a day go by without writing and working on your career. Even if it’s just 15 minutes here and there it adds up. The work habits you build will determine your success or failure.

Every day you skip your writing work, you bring yourself closer and closer to failure, anxiety, stress, and the really bad habit of procrastination that dooms far too many writers’ promising careers.

2. Study

Learn everything you can about writing, publishing, and marketing. Ignorance is not bliss. It will ruin your dreams.

Check out the best books on writing.

Learn how to improve your readability.

Understand how to do market research for writing and learn more about your customers and readers.

Every day, study so you can learn a little bit more about the incredible art of writing.

3. Make Mistakes

You’ll learn more from your mistakes than just about anything else.

Be bold. Get rejected. Publish crappy articles and books (at first).

You learn as you go and you have to be willing to fail or you’ll never learn what you need to learn to succeed.

The only difference between you and the most successful writers in the world is they’ve made more mistakes than you have. Learn from your mistakes and keep going.

4. Get Rid of Bad Habits

To become a successful writer, I had to get rid of my addiction to video games, binge-watching TV series and complaining. I also had to develop new habits like working out, taking walks, meditating, and asking for help. I had to ask hundreds of people for help along the way. I never could have done it alone.

Bad habits and addictions will destroy your creative output. You need every extra hour you can get to take care of yourself and focus on your writing career.

If you waste that time on bad habits, you’ll be shooting yourself in the foot.

5. Build Relationships

Meet other writers and creative people with big ambitions and good work habits. Just being around people who published 1, 2, or more books since you started yours will motivate the heck out of you.

You’ll see that other people are succeeding and you’ll be inspired to work extra hard to make your dreams come true.

6. Ignore the Noise

Don’t waste time with complainers, energy vampires, or depressed people. Their energy will infect you. It’s nearly impossible to create while depressed or stressed.

If you find something or someone in your life is distracting you from being productive, happy, and fulfilled, deal with it now! Putting it off will only make you feel more stressed, anxious, and depressed. And if that’s how you feel day after day after day, chances are you’ll never become a highly productive writer.

7. Manage Your Emotions

Writing is painful as hell. You will feel miserable sometimes. You’ll be scared, angry, hurt, feel emotions you haven’t felt or haven’t wanted to feel for years. It’ll open up parts of yourself you never imagined we’re there. Embrace it. Get help. See a therapist. Talk about your feelings and problems.

8. Take Care of Yourself

You are your biggest obstacle to success. You have to learn to work harder on improving yourself than you do at your writing career.

When you work on improving your life, even if it’s just a little bit, it’ll help you become more creative and productive.

Take that walk around the block. Eat healthier. Meditate. Get rid of bad relationships. Make your relationships better. Reduce your stress.

Small things may not seem that important but they can make all the difference in the world over your lifetime.  Creating is hard enough without adding 10 more problems to your life.

Solve the little problems and becoming a more productive creator will be a lot easier.

9. Add Value Always

Focus on adding value not making money.

Your readers need your help. Your job is to help them, no matter what kind of books you write. Your story and the message could change their life. It’s your job to do the best you can possibly do to help your reader. Nothing else is as important to your career as helping your readers.

When you have a big decision to make about the direction of your work, the title for your book, or any other creative decision, ask yourself:

“What’s best for my reader?”

Whatever the answer is, it’s almost always the right choice. Do what’s best for your reader. Add value to their lives. If you do that well enough, everything else will work out.

10. Experiment

If what you’ve been doing hasn’t been working, it’s up to you to change it. Do something different. Try new things. Experiment. Play like a kid. You are smart enough to figure it out if you really want to become a successful and productive writer.

Believe in yourself, believing in your dreams, and believe in your work.

You can do it if you’re willing to do the right thing day after day after day.

That’s how you build a successful life and a successful writing career.
……

…..
If you liked this post, please visit my friends from TCK Publishing as below are some other articles you might love:

HAPPY NEW YEAR YOU – Brand Yourself For 2019! Should Our Brand Be All The Same? Guest Jason From Strong Social Tells Us.

Happy New Year’s Eve and Welcome All! Brand Yourself in 2019!

>>><

imageedit_8_7596870183

<<>>>

Brand Voice – Should It Remain the Same Across All Social Networks

>><<

How is your brand personality determined?

It is largely determined by the words you use in communication, as well as the kind of sentences you write. Your brand voice reveals whether your brand is corporate, academic, deadpan, grave, serious, witty, funny, clever, and so on.

When defining a company’s brand voice, the problem is that rigid guidelines can stifle you. Your brand’s personality has to appeal to different people in different locations, so like a human personality, it has to retain some elasticity. Like, a central character that can convey a message in different tones. For example, your blog posts may appear enthusiastic and professional, while the promotional copy for your social media shares should probably be less enthusiastic.

Here’s what you should know about ways of using your brand voice across different social networks.

1. Instagram

Instagram is the place for B2B and B2C companies. On this platform, you can drive brand engagement and awareness with positive visuals and copy. Thus, on Instagram, you can use the classic marketing tone.

On Instagram, the line that divides branded content and UGC (user-generated content) is quite blurry. Also, it is more challenging to spot Ads, especially from influencers with undisclosed relationships with brands. When it comes to hashtags, Instagram is quite friendly towards the use of hashtags. According to SproutSocial, about 80% of all users follow at least one brand, while 7 out of 10 hashtags on Instagram are branded. It means that you should be as clear as possible about what you want your followers to do – click the link in Bio, tag a friend, or swipe up for a free trial if you are running ads.

<<<<

>>>>

2. Facebook

Facebook is an exciting opportunity for any brand being that it’s the most extensive social media network in the world. With 2.27 billion monthly active users, it’s very challenging to stand out and maximize your reach. You need a distinct brand voice and identity.

What makes an effective Facebook copy? It should be accessible, familiar, and slightly informal. Unlike Twitter or Instagram, Facebook’s user group is more intergenerational. That’s why the emotion that dominates the platform is nostalgia. The content that can recall the “golden years” of your readers resonates best, whether you want to reach out to Millennials recalling the 1990s or Baby Boomers.

On the other hand, if you can’t appeal to nostalgic content, you can use particular calls to action, such as – join the debate, develop an opinion, and inform yourself. Have the copy tell your audience that there’s a larger conversation happening without them. Facebook audiences want to be entertained, so hit them with your most potent and most human content.

4. Twitter

Active Twitter copy is quick and witty. There is so much conversation happening so fast that brands often can’t move quickly enough to keep up. It is the platform of instant information, and people there want to know what’s going on this very second. Twitter is no place for old news. That’s why you should use it to experiment with your brand voice because Twitter users appreciate a more daring and experimental voice. If you have any humorous and funny content where you’re trying out some jokes, you should use Twitter as your experimental ground.

If all you’re sharing are dull press releases, people most likely won’t follow you. Better have something funny or something valuable to add to a conversation.

5. LinkedIn

According to Pew Research Center, LinkedIn is mostly used by people in the 30-49 age range. Most of them are college graduates in urban areas. The number of LinkedIn users increased to 500 million between the years 2016 and 2017. Being a professionally-oriented social network, people go there to look for jobs or to offer them, as well as share valuable content. That means that your LinkedIn copy should take the readers straight to the point, without beating around the bush. The competition is a lot less fierce than on Facebook, but you’ll still need to give a fresh and unique angle to your material to attract your audience.

To conclude, your brand voice does have to stay coherent across all social media channels. However, every social network is specific and attracts different people. The best brand voice strategy is to have an inner brand voice, but deliver your messages and engage in slightly different tones that resonate the best on each social network.

So in the coming in NEW YEAR, make sure you Brand Yourself effectively throughout Media and Social Media TOO!

Please visit my friend Jason of StrongSocial for more amazing tips and articles all of 2019! Cat